Far Out Flora

Oregon Sugar Pod a Poppin

| 11 Comments

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

After ripping out the cherry tomatoes, we planted four Oregon Sugar Pod II Snow Pea Plants.  Can I say there’s nothing like harvesting a pea pod off the vine and popping it into your mouth?  Crispy, crunch, delicious.  Since we had some bad luck previously, we modified our planting container a little bit.

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

We started these Oregon Sugarpod II last October from small plant seedlings.  The last time we planted peas, the birds attacked them fierce.  This time we wrapped a mesh barrier around the trellis of the container to protecting their tender leaves.  We already had the mesh laying around from another project, so the cost was just some extra time to tie it on.

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

Here’s a couple more pic of the Oregon Sugar Pod II (Pisum sativum).  Each one was taken every couple of weeks.  We were surprised how fast they grew.  Oh hey…quick shout out to Life on the Balcony.  We won this self watering container from Fern during one of her contest.  Yo Fern, the container is still going strong…thanks again!

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

Here it is about mid December, about 10 weeks after we planted them.  I believe that’s the day we picked our first pea pod.  Yum.

Oregon Sugarpod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II - Pisum sativum

Oregon Sugar Pod II is advertised as a dwarf plant, and would have to say it stopped about 4 feet tall.  We ripped off the mesh for easier picking, and seems that it did a great job keeping the birds at bay.  Our neighbor says that you can use the leaves for cooking or a salad topper, but we haven’t tried it yet.  Do any of you eat the leaves from edible peas?

– Far Out Flora

11 Comments

  1. we plant sugar snap peas from soaked seeds up north. they grow like crazy and produce until mark makes me rip them out in late september. we froze extras this year…going to plant even more this year. seems we cannot put anything in the ground until june 1st yet we get a really good harvest. my brocolli went nuts this past year…got a good 10 cuttings from each plant and i had nine…froze brocolli too and green beans, planted kentucky wonder pole beans, i am done with bush type.
    no, i have never tried eating the leaves, have enough with the pods. and they are so yummy off the vine. i prefer to pick them young before the pea gets too big inside. love your succulent garden, have a few in the house but that’s about it. they die in the winter if you leave them outside.
    take care and be well. xo

    • Whoa Susan, you have a lot going on. Glad you has a bounty enough to freeze. I bet that heat really drives them after June 1. For us, it’s pretty much cool veggies. Those tomatoes, though they produced…weren’t the best. They need a little more heat.

      • Matti, try growing “Tigerella” tomato from Baker Creek…I’m right on the coast, near Arcata, and it produces well for me (it’s not too big but larger than a cherry). The plants will over-winter in my greenhouse and fruit again in the spring. It is a tasty and prolific tomato.

  2. Mmmm…I want some. There is already a little patch of my new garden that used to be a vegetable garden so I am definitely going to plant some snow peas. But not today. It is cold and windy today. (also I love your kangaroo planter army)

  3. Far Out Flora… I’m enjoying your posts. You make me smile and you give me ideas. What more could I ask for?

  4. Oregon Sugar Pod II is one of my favorite peas, and yes, you can eat the tender vine tips and leaves. They taste just like the peas, and go great in salads. Heck, once my vine’s reach their peak, I’ll harvest the tips as much as the pods!

    I did find myself switching from Oregon to Super Snap Pea (at least, I think that was the name … something ‘Super’) because Oregon doesn’t top out over 3′, and I finally had a wall to grow peas on. One support and a few months later, I had about two dozen plants growing in an 8 foot row, and it STILL wasn’t enough to give me some to freeze! I can’t help constantly eating them!

  5. Great job with the sugar pea planting! Glad those bad ol birds didn’t get them. I remember planting these with my Mom and we would eat them right off the vine they were so sweet!

  6. It’s amazing to me that you are planting and harvesting at this time of year. Ahhh….California. I’m also digging all the other plants in the background. The Horsetail looks beautiful and lush, and I love those kangaroo planters!!

  7. Tender pea shoots can be eaten! They are considered a delicacy in Asian cultures. Generally, only the top 2-3 inches are harvested (any lower and the vines get too fibrous). Try them sauteed with garlic.

  8. This is the second year I have grown this variety and all I can say is that they are incredibly impressive! My children have been picking ALOT of peas each day off of a dozen or less plants. They go great in salads, stir-fried or even right off the vine. These are some of the best snap peas I have grown. They are incredibly productive for their size.

    Here are some pictures I took of my sugar pod snow peas in production: http://scientificgardener.blogspot.com/2014/02/oregon-sugar-pod-ii-snow-pea.html

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *.